Category: ‘Issues’


Posted on August 31st, 2020

Septic System Maintenance

Four Key Elements from the EPA:

  • Inspect and Pump Frequently
  • Use Water Efficiently
  • Properly Dispose of Waste
  • Maintain Your Drainfield

Link to the EPA: SepticSmart Homeowners

Link to:  Home Owner’s Septic Care Guide from the Health Dept. of NW Michigan

 

Septic Maintenance from watershedcouncil.org:

  • Have your septic pumped every 3-5 years.
  • Do not use chemical products that claim to be a substitute for maintenance pumping.
  • For optimal performance, minimize your use of household chemicals and cleaners.
  • Avoid putting grease, hair, cigarette butts, facial tissues, feminine hygiene supplies, band aids, paints, solvents, or any other household wastes containing hazardous, toxic, or non-biodegradable materials down the drain and toilet.
  • Never build, pave, or drive over a drain field or septic tank.
  • Watch for woody vegetation growing on or near the drain field. Deep roots can cause damage.
  • Runoff from your lawn, driveway, roof, and other hard surfaces should be directed away from your drain field.
  • Do not apply fertilizer around a drain field.
  • In shoreline areas, plant or retain a natural strip of vegetation along the water’s edge. The deep roots of native plants intercept and utilize nutrients found in shallow groundwater contaminated with septic system leachate that migrates toward the lake.
  • Conserve water.

Link to Watershed Council:  Septic Systems


Posted on August 31st, 2020

Swimmer’s Itch Task Force

A Swimmer’s Itch Task Force formed June 2020. The mission is to reduce the incidences of Swimmer’s Itch (SI) in Douglas Lake through a program that must continue every year. Volunteers would be essential for the program’s success.

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7/14/2020 Swimmer’s Itch:  Next Steps – (from 7/14/2020 eNews)

The Swimmer’s Itch Task Force, chaired by Kim and Ed Grant, submitted its Report describing the occurrence, severity and suspected parasitic sites resulting in swimmer’s itch on Douglas Lake this summer.  The report included background information, previous studies of the problem, options to address the problem, and the experience of other inland lakes with swimmer’s itch problems.  The first recommendation requested DLIA to fund an initial swimmer’s itch assessment of Douglas Lake.

At the DLIA Executive Board meeting on July 9, 2020, the Board approved $1500 to fund a proposal from Swimmer’s Itch (SI) Solutions, LLC to conduct the needs assessment.  Field work on the project will take place in July-August. The study will document the swimmer’s itch lifecycle present on the lake, including presence of the swimmer’s itch parasite and evidence that the Common Merganser is the host associated with the parasite’s lifecycle on the lake.  This will involve collection of snails around the lake and examination of the snails to determine if they carry the swimmer’s itch parasite.  Parasites found in the snails will provide an accurate species assessment of swimmer’s itch parasites in Douglas Lake.  A bird survey will also be conducted to determine how many merganser broods are present on Douglas Lake.

SI Solutions’ report should be submitted in mid-September and the Board will be meeting with the Task Force Chairs to discuss the report, possible next steps, the financial requirements for these next steps and logistics of permitting requirements (from DNR) for relocation of mergansers if that is the appropriate next step.

For now, unfortunately, Douglas Lake residents, their families and guests must continue to use all preventive measures to avoid swimmer’s itch and take advantage of those remedies that provide some relief from the nasty rash.

Submitted by the DLIA President Mary Ellen Sheridan

Links: 7/7/2020 DLIA Swimmer’s Itch Task Force Report

6/24/2020 Swimmers Itch Task Force Seeks Information
(from 6/24/20 eNews)

Summer 2020 is starting off to be a very bad year for swimmers itch.  Some years this irritating and painful rash (from parasite) isn’t much of a problem; other years, it’s prevalent.  2020 is not a good year. A new DLIA Task Force co-chaired by Kim and Ed Grant has been formed to identify and evaluate cost options for mitigating the problem of Swimmers Itch at Douglas Lake.  As a first step, Kim is “fact finding.”
If you or family members/visiting friends, et al. have experienced swimmers itch this summer please report this to email hidden; JavaScript is required. Kim requests that you report the date, approximate lake location where exposure to the parasite might have occurred (e.g. swimming around North Fishtail Bay or playing in shallow water around Silver Strand location X) and severity of rash.

Brief DLIA History of SI:

Swimmer’s Itch has been bothering humans around the world for as long as humans have been around. In 2008 and 2009, DLIA SI Task Force participated in the planning of a hopeful program to reduce the itch. The cost was prohibitive at over $50,000.

The Michigan Swimmer’s Itch Partnership (MSIP) formed in 2014 working with various entities for funding and solutions. In late 2018, a few staff members from the Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council became part of MSIP.

All along DLIA has stayed informed, attending conferences, and sharing resources about treatment with the Lake community. In recent years, some Michigan lakes have seen SI incidences reduced through an annual merganser relocation program.

A new DLIA Task Force was formed in June 2020 with hopes of reducing the incidences of SI on DL by 2022. If the proposed program is a fit for Douglas Lake and the DLIA Executive Board approves the funding, annual volunteers will be essential for success. It is also important to recognize that Swimmer’s Itch is not attributable solely to mergansers.  Other waterfowl and even mammals can be conduits for snails which host the parasite that causes Swimmer’s Itch.


Posted on February 2nd, 2017

Boat Ramp Maintenance

DLIA members volunteer to monitor and maintain the condition of the township boat ramp. Contact Stuart Case to volunteer.

– Power Loading causes damage to launch ramps. –

In addition to Mother Nature’s work, power loading causes damage to the launch area. “Power loading” is using the boat motor to load and unload a boat onto and off the trailer. The propeller wash creates a hole at the end of the ramp and a sand mound beyond the ramp. It creates hazardous conditions, and will cause time consuming and expensive ramp repairs. Read more of Boat Ramp Maintenance »


Posted on January 27th, 2017

Because We Care

Report Sightings or Issues …

  • Loon information and issues to email hidden; JavaScript is required and/or 231-537-3269
  • Suspected aquatic invasive species sighting to email hidden; JavaScript is required and/or 313-919-1812
  • Purple Loosestrife sighting to 231-537-3269

Read more of Because We Care »


Posted on January 22nd, 2017

European Frog-bit

European FrogbitMichigan DNR Alert:

Sept. 1, 2020
Contact: email hidden; JavaScript is required, 517-284-5814

Invasive European frog-bit found in Mid-Michigan

Boaters, waterfowl hunters and anglers can help prevent further spread

The Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy recently confirmed the presence of European frog-bit, an aquatic invasive plant, in four lakes within the Waterloo Recreation Area in Jackson and Washtenaw counties and one impoundment in the Dansville State Game Area in Ingham County.

Aquatic invasive species have the potential to harm Michigan’s environment, economy and human health. European frog-bit, which resembles a miniature water lily with leaves about the size of a quarter, can form dense mats on the surface of slow-moving waters like bayous, backwaters and wetlands. These mats can impede boat traffic and alter food and habitat for ducks and fish.

Spreading across Michigan – See the full bulletin

What you can do

To prevent further spread of European frog-bit, boaters, waterfowl hunters and anglers should “Clean, Drain and Dry” boats, trailers and gear before moving them to a new location.

 

Invasive Species Alert 2017: European frogbit has been detected in Great Lakes waterways along southeastern Michigan, in Lake Huron and in western Michigan lakes. This invasive species is not listed on the Midwest Aquatic Plant Reference Chart that was distributed to the membership in 2015.

Please report any siting to email hidden; JavaScript is required, 231-347-1181 and UMBS at 231-539-8408.