Author Archive


Posted on March 6th, 2017

Loon Nesting Program

Since 1992, we have been practicing loon preservation by constructing artificial nesting platforms. Loons prefer to nest on islands to distance themselves from predators such as raccoons. We belong to the Michigan Loon Preservation Association and you may consider joining also. They provide valuable loon information. Read more of Loon Nesting Program »


Posted on February 2nd, 2017

The UMBS Stewards Program

Feel compelled to help maintain the beautiful 10,000 acres of the UMBS Bio Station?  Join the UMBS Stewards once a week or every other week during the summer. Contact Stuart Case. Read more of The UMBS Stewards Program »


Posted on February 2nd, 2017

Boat Ramp Maintenance

DLIA members volunteer to monitor and maintain the condition of the township boat ramp. Contact Stuart Case to volunteer.

– Power Loading causes damage to launch ramps. –

In addition to Mother Nature’s work, power loading causes damage to the launch area. “Power loading” is using the boat motor to load and unload a boat onto and off the trailer. The propeller wash creates a hole at the end of the ramp and a sand mound beyond the ramp. It creates hazardous conditions, and will cause time consuming and expensive ramp repairs. Read more of Boat Ramp Maintenance »


Posted on January 27th, 2017

Because We Care

Report Sightings or Issues …

  • Loon information and issues to email hidden; JavaScript is required and/or 231-537-3269
  • Suspected aquatic invasive species sighting to email hidden; JavaScript is required and/or 313-919-1812
  • Purple Loosestrife sighting to 231-537-3269

Read more of Because We Care »


Posted on January 22nd, 2017

European Frog-bit

European FrogbitMichigan DNR Alert:

Sept. 1, 2020
Contact: email hidden; JavaScript is required, 517-284-5814

Invasive European frog-bit found in Mid-Michigan

Boaters, waterfowl hunters and anglers can help prevent further spread

The Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy recently confirmed the presence of European frog-bit, an aquatic invasive plant, in four lakes within the Waterloo Recreation Area in Jackson and Washtenaw counties and one impoundment in the Dansville State Game Area in Ingham County.

Aquatic invasive species have the potential to harm Michigan’s environment, economy and human health. European frog-bit, which resembles a miniature water lily with leaves about the size of a quarter, can form dense mats on the surface of slow-moving waters like bayous, backwaters and wetlands. These mats can impede boat traffic and alter food and habitat for ducks and fish.

Spreading across Michigan – See the full bulletin

What you can do

To prevent further spread of European frog-bit, boaters, waterfowl hunters and anglers should “Clean, Drain and Dry” boats, trailers and gear before moving them to a new location.

 

Invasive Species Alert 2017: European frogbit has been detected in Great Lakes waterways along southeastern Michigan, in Lake Huron and in western Michigan lakes. This invasive species is not listed on the Midwest Aquatic Plant Reference Chart that was distributed to the membership in 2015.

Please report any siting to email hidden; JavaScript is required, 231-347-1181 and UMBS at 231-539-8408.


« Older Entries